Resident to host free Pilates workshop

Instructor and physical therapist will co-teach at gathering in home

Posted 2/5/19

Trying Pilates for the first time can be just about as confusing as its name. That's why instructor Kelly Pointer, in partnership with local physical therapist Dr. Christopher Robl, are hosting a …

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Resident to host free Pilates workshop

Instructor and physical therapist will co-teach at gathering in home

Posted

Trying Pilates for the first time can be just about as confusing as its name.

That's why instructor Kelly Pointer, in partnership with local physical therapist Dr. Christopher Robl, are hosting a free workshop in mid-February.

“It's a mindful exercise,” said Pointer, standing in a low-lit, comfortable studio, lined with long black mats and clean equipment, in the basement of her Highlands Ranch home. “Pilates is kind of like poetry in motion.”

German physical trainer Joseph Pilates developed the workout in the early 20th century. He referred to his method — which involves small, precise movements that target the core — as "Contrology." The trendy workout gained popularity in the U.S. in the early 2000s.

Pointer, a Chicago native and longtime athlete, always knew she would enjoy Pilates. And when her friend, an instructor, asked her to try a class, she fell in love.

In 2013, Pointer completed her certification in classical Pilates. The course required more than 1,000 hours of practice, she said. In 2015, she opened her in-home studio, CorePoint Pilates, where she teaches group classes, private classes and semi-private classes. Her schedule and pricing is available at corepointpilates.com.

“I love helping people feel better and learn about proper balance and movement,” said Pointer, an upbeat mom of two. “You can take what you learn in Pilates and apply it to other parts of your life.”

Since starting Pilates, many of her clients have seen improvement in their overall physical health. They find it easier to garden, cycle, ski, run, even sit.

The benefits of the workout are far-reaching, health organizations say. According to a Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise study, women who completed 36 weeks of Pilates training strengthened their abs by an average of 21 percent. Not to worry — men are more than welcome at Pointer's classes.

With a focus on breathing, Pilates increases lung capacity. It strengthens the spine, improves posture and balance, and helps with bone density, Pointer said.

Pointer will further explain the history and benefits of Pilates, and demonstrate some poses, at the free, one-hour workshop from 7-8 p.m. on Feb. 13 at her studio.

Dr. Christopher Robl, from the Physio Room, will touch on how Pilates and physical therapy can act as complementary forms of exercise for people looking to improve strength and flexibility.

To register for the workshop, visit https://bit.ly/2BbZUPs. Space is limited, but if the workshop is a success, Pointer foresees another one taking place in the future.

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