Red predominates in gallery exhibit

Color is theme that ties together works on display

Posted 10/15/19

There are certainly many ways of seeing, envisioning, interpreting the primary color red … “Code Red” is the Littleton Fine Arts Guild’s latest exhibit, running through Nov. 10 at the …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution of $25 or more in Nov. 2018-2019, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Red predominates in gallery exhibit

Color is theme that ties together works on display

Posted

There are certainly many ways of seeing, envisioning, interpreting the primary color red …

“Code Red” is the Littleton Fine Arts Guild’s latest exhibit, running through Nov. 10 at the historic red Depot Art Gallery.

The challenge was: “Red paintings … or something you’re passionate about …” Responses are imaginative and varied, including the “People’s Choice,” chosen during the opening reception: “Super Worm Equinox Moon,” by photographer Bill Knoll. Many readers will recall heading outside to view that recent red moon …

The juror for this interesting new exhibit of paintings, photographs and mixed media was Jo Anne Nelson, who exhibits a large, red, mixed media piece, “A place on the side.” She wrote: “… I encourage each individual to create a place where there is only creative thought and peace.” She has exhibited her art in Parker and elsewhere.

The color red does indeed jump out at a viewer as one’s eyes circle the gallery: from a few bright pottery pieces to Christopher Schrank’s subtle, textured mixed-media panel, with a small red block at lower right (honorable mention), to Jeff Velarde’s large, realistic oil painting, “20th and Blake,” showing fans pouring into the red brick Coors Field (second place).

City scenes took top spots: First place was awarded to Sharon Wink for her subtle, expertly painted oil, “Venice,” which includes soft reds and oranges in her depiction of historic houses along a Venetian canal, with water glistening around them.

Nelson chose Jeff Velarde’s large oil “Beneath the Neon” as best of show. It depicts a lone figure with a cane, shielded from rain under a flashy theater marquee, presumably in some American city, while others walk past on wet, reflective sidewalks. Again, painting skill is evident, as well as storytelling skill. Is he meeting someone? On the way home? Does he have a home? Where has he been? You can smell the soaked pavement.

On another theme, third place went to Rita Campbell’s cheerful red, orange, pink “Poppy Delight” and an honorable mention to Rita Campbell’s watercolor “Poppies Aglow.”

The visitor might want to start some early holiday shopping … New member Linda Burch, who joined the guild recently — “four days after moving from Arizona” — displays some sparkly jewelry and beaded bags. Glass and pottery pieces beckon, and bright baskets, woven from fabric, are on the front table near the entrance. Bobbi Shupe’s Treasure Box and gleaming fused glass bowls by S. Van Der Kamp are appealing — as well as Brian Serff’s small paintings, “Venice” and “Myknos.”

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.