Mother who killed her baby gets life in prison

The mandatory sentence was handed down Nov. 15

Posted 11/18/19

A woman convicted of killing her own newborn child was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole at a Nov. 15 hearing. The sentence for Camille Wasinger-Konrad, 25, was mandatory …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution of $25 or more in Nov. 2018-2019, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Mother who killed her baby gets life in prison

The mandatory sentence was handed down Nov. 15

Posted

A woman convicted of killing her own newborn child was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole at a Nov. 15 hearing.

The sentence for Camille Wasinger-Konrad, 25, was mandatory after she was found guilty of the January 2018 death of her daughter.

Wasinger-Konrad gave birth to her daughter at a rented room in a Highlands Ranch home in the early hours of Jan. 2, 2018, according to a news release. She covered the baby's mouth to silence her and then threw the infant into a neighbor's backyard.

The neighbor found the deceased baby at about 10 p.m. that night and called the Douglas County Sheriff's Office.

“What kind of human being could do such a thing?” District Attorney George Brachler said after the sentencing hearing.

In 2000, Colorado passed the Safe Haven Law, which allows a parent to hand over a newborn, up to 72-hours-old, to an employee at any fire station or hospital with no questions asked, according to a release from the DA's office.

Brachler spoke to media about the case outside the courtroom, calling back his 25 years of experience.

“You get to a point where you think you've seen the worst of the worst of humanity,” he said. “Every once in a while, you get a case like this that reminds you there are greater depths that people can sink to.”

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.