Life under a stay-at-home order in Castle Rock

Some areas of town deserted while others are bustling

Jessica Gibbs
jgibbs@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 4/1/20

Several days after Gov. Jared Polis issued a stay-at-home order to help slow the spread of COVID-19 in Colorado, Castle Rock was bustling in some areas and deserted in others. On March 30, four days …

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Life under a stay-at-home order in Castle Rock

Some areas of town deserted while others are bustling

Posted

Several days after Gov. Jared Polis issued a stay-at-home order to help slow the spread of COVID-19 in Colorado, Castle Rock was bustling in some areas and deserted in others.

On March 30, four days after the stay-at-home order went into effect, people mulled through Philip S. Miller Park, mostly alone or in pairs and maintaining distance from other visitors. Although, a steady stream of park visitors walked up and down the 200-step Challenge Hill, passing others as they went.

Near and throughout the Promenade, many businesses are temporarily closed, leaving typically busy stores shuttered and parking lots empty.

The Outlets at Castle Rock has announced it is temporarily closed.

Other businesses — home improvement stores and grocery stores — are open and hotspots in town. Parking lots at Lowe's, Walmart and King Soopers were full, with customers flowing in and out.

The governor's order still allows people whose jobs are considered essential to keep working. Restaurants and other eateries can continue offering takeout or delivery. State parks can remain open for people to get outdoors for exercise, while playgrounds are closed.

Yellow caution tape roped off play structures at Philip S. Miller Park, warning families not to use the facilities. Electronic signs flashed nearby reminding people to socially distance and maintain 6 feet from one another.

As of March 30, it was unclear how long the shelter-at home order would last. President Donald Trump recently extended social distancing guidelines through the end of April, while Colorado's order was originally planned to end after April 11, but Polis said it would likely be extended.

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