County board speaks on ballot issues

Commissioners oppose three measures, support two ballot issues

Posted 10/16/18

The Douglas County Board of Commissioners has taken positions on five ballot issues up for election this November — opposing three issues and supporting two. The board supported the passage of …

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County board speaks on ballot issues

Commissioners oppose three measures, support two ballot issues

Posted

The Douglas County Board of Commissioners has taken positions on five ballot issues up for election this November — opposing three issues and supporting two.

The board supported the passage of Proposition 109, called “Authorize Bonds for Transportation Needs,” one of two transportation funding ballot issues voters will consider.

Proposition 109 would use existing general funds to allow the state to bond $3.5 billion for state highway projects, according to the Colorado Department of Transportation.

Proposition 110 proposes raising sales tax by .62 percent. The tax would sunset in 20 years and raise $767 million in the first year, allowing the state to bond up to $6 billion for transportation projects, according to CDOT.

The resolution commissioners passed emphasized Proposition 109 does not increase taxes, something the board opposes. Commissioner Roger Partridge said it was time for the state legislature to “step up” and provide more funding for roads.

Commissioners also passed a resolution supporting the passage of Amendment W, called “Election Ballot Format for Judicial Retention Elections.” The amendment regards ballot wording and seeks to shorten language and ballot space for judges looking to retain their office.

Commissioners opposed Proposition 112, Amendment 73 and Amendment 74.

Proposition 112 would amend the state Constitution with new setbacks for oil and gas developments from homes, schools, hospitals and other structures. The setbacks would increase from 500 to 2,500 feet from homes and 1,000 feet from high-occupancy structures.

Amendment 73 centers around school funding. It would increase the tax rate on individuals making an annual salary of more than $150,000, increase the corporate income tax rate from 4.63 percent to 6.0 percent and fix property tax rates at 7.0 percent.

Commissioner Diane Holbert referred to the amendment as “nefarious” for corporations, small businesses and families alike.

Amendment 74 would allow property owners to petition the state for reimbursement if new laws or regulations decrease their property value.

Commissioner Lora Thomas said the amendment could result in lawsuits that delay needed government projects and would cost “our citizens both time and money.”

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