Chalk up 20 years for Centennial: City shines spotlight on two-decade anniversary

Ellis Arnold
earnold@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 10/5/21

The City of Centennial continued to highlight that 20 years have passed since its beginnings as a city, hosting a celebration on Sept. 18 that saw current and former elected officials — and some of …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution in 2020-2021, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access includes access to all websites and online content.


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Chalk up 20 years for Centennial: City shines spotlight on two-decade anniversary

Posted

The City of Centennial continued to highlight that 20 years have passed since its beginnings as a city, hosting a celebration on Sept. 18 that saw current and former elected officials — and some of the city's founders — gather with other community members at Centennial's flagship shopping center.

The city put on the event "to show appreciation to residents and local businesses — past, present and future," according to a news release.

The festivities included a "classic" car show, chalk art on display and Arapahoe High School's annual homecoming parade cruising through, according to the news release. The event took place at The Streets at SouthGlenn outdoor mall off University Boulevard and Arapahoe Road in west Centennial.

The event also included a free pancake breakfast, commemorating the pancake breakfast that Centennial's five founders had together in 1998 to consider whether to try to form a city.

That summer, Randy Pye, John Brackney, Brian Vogt, Ed Bosier and Pete Ross gathered at a pancake restaurant to consider the advantages of forming a municipality to prevent Greenwood Village from absorbing commercial areas in present-day Centennial.

After two years of court battles, a green light from the state legislature and thousands of petition signatures, 77% of about 28,000 voters in what is now Centennial approved the formation of the city. That election took place Sept. 12, 2000, but Centennial wasn't legally established as a city until Feb. 7, 2001.

All current and former Centennial elected officials were invited to the celebration at SouthGlenn, according to Kelly Ohaver, a spokesperson for the city.

Among the former city councilmembers who attended, according to Ohaver, were Bart Miller, Keith Gardner, Ron Weidmann, Andrea Suhaka, Ken Lucas, Susan Nix, C.J. Whelan, Rebecca McClellan, Patrick Anderson and Vorry Moon, along with former Mayor Cathy Noon and Pye, who served as Centennial's first mayor.

Among the current city councilmembers who attended, according to Ohaver, were Kathy Turley, Mike Sutherland, Tammy Maurer, Christine Sweetland, Richard Holt, Marlo Alston and Don Sheehan, along with Mayor Stephanie Piko. Brackney, one of the founders, also attended.

The event also featured live local music from Jenny Shawhan, Voodoo Kings and Groovealicious, according to the release.

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.