Young Marines honor Navajo code talkers

World War II soldiers played crucial role in Pacific

Staff report
Posted 9/16/17

Eight members of the Mountain View Young Marines in Franktown joined other Young Marines in Window Rock, Arizona, to honor Navajo code talkers from World War II.

“Navajo Code Talkers Day is an event that the Young Marines and the Navajo code …

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Young Marines honor Navajo code talkers

World War II soldiers played crucial role in Pacific

Posted

Eight members of the Mountain View Young Marines in Franktown joined other Young Marines in Window Rock, Arizona, to honor Navajo code talkers from World War II.

“Navajo Code Talkers Day is an event that the Young Marines and the Navajo code talkers look forward to every year," said Brenda McNulty, Young Marines event coordinator. "Our partnership between the descendants of the Navajo code talkers and the Young Marines has strengthened year after year since 2006. It is a collaborative effort in which both parties create a successful event for everyone to enjoy.”

The Navajo code talkers took part in every assault the U.S. Marines conducted in the Pacific from 1942-45. They transmitted messages by telephone and radio in their native language, a code that the Japanese never broke.

For three days, the Young Marines served as escorts for the veterans and performed other duties.

“Just being around these special veterans makes us feel as though we could take a step back in time,” said Col. William P. Davis USMC (Ret.), national executive director and CEO of the Young Marines. “The Young Marines are assuring the legacy of these very special veterans. They will not be forgotten.”

Young Marines is a youth education and service program for boys and girls that focuses on character building, leadership, self-discipline and promoting a healthy, drug-free lifestyle. The program is open to ages 8 through high school.

Young Marines develop friendships, many times that last into adulthood. Besides Navajo Code Talkers Day, Young Marines attend leadership schools, visit places such as Pearl Harbor and American historical sites, participate in summer camps for sailing, simulated flying, cattle ranching, scuba diving, and more.

For information about Young Marines, go to www.YoungMarines.com.

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