Local land trust wraps up 31st year

Douglas County group is devoted to great outdoors

Staff report
Posted 11/2/18

Douglas Land Conservancy has spent more than three decades protecting open space, agricultural lands, wildlife habitat and scenic views in the area. The Castle Rock-based land trust will celebrate …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution of $25 or more in Nov. 2018-2019, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Local land trust wraps up 31st year

Douglas County group is devoted to great outdoors

Posted

Douglas Land Conservancy has spent more than three decades protecting open space, agricultural lands, wildlife habitat and scenic views in the area.

The Castle Rock-based land trust will celebrate its legacy at the annual Oak Leaf Awards event Nov. 9. The conservancy also will honor Ninia Ritchie, conservationist and owner of JA Ranch, which has hosted one of the land conservancy's fundraising events for 10 years. The 2018 Natural Douglas County photo contest winners also will be recognized.

Douglas Land Conservancy was started in November 1987 by residents concerned about the loss of open space as the Front Range began to boom, according to a news release. The land trust has quietly and consistently worked since then, creating a legacy that includes public parks in Castle Rock and Parker, public open spaces in Douglas County, a community meadow in Perry Park, working ranches in two counties, protected wildlife habitat and countless scenic views, the release said.

The land conservancy protects 11,398 acres of private lands and 11,102 acres of public lands with conservation easements that require regular monitoring visits. In addition, it is working on several projects that could protect an additional 3,000 acres, including a historic ranch, critical wildlife habitats, wetlands and more public open space.

The conservancy's long-range plan is to continue to steward its protected lands and to protect more open spaces in the region.

“DLC has worked hard over the past 30 years to accomplish two 'forever' goals — to protect additional pristine open lands and to maintain the viability and integrity of the wildlife habitat, agriculture, scenic quality, outdoor recreation and peaceful enjoyment of the open lands currently protected with our willing and engaged property owners,” land conservancy board president and founding board member Jane Boand said in a news release.

The land conservancy also has greatly increased its educational programs, launching a weekly Wildlife Wednesday photo contest, offering regular guided education hikes on public open space and sponsoring a speakers' educational bureau.

“Raising public awareness about the importance of having a local land trust that provides for the protection of natural resources and open spaces is the key to providing these beautiful protected lands for future generations to enjoy,” DLC Executive Director Patti Hostetler said in the release.

The land trust also works closely with Castle Rock, Parker and Douglas County to promote appreciation of open space, wildlife and scenic landscapes.

“We think our effort in public education will increase the community's interest in protecting the exceptional landscapes, wildlife and scenery of our county,” Hostetler said. “It also helps DLC publicize our mission and our dedication to preserving the quality of life we all enjoy.”

As it begins its next 30 years, DLC looks forward to carrying on its mission.

“I believe we have demonstrated that DLC is here for the long run, and we promise to continue as good stewards of the lands entrusted to our protection,” Boand said in the release.

If you go

Douglas Land Conservancy Oak Leaf Award Benefit

WHEN: Friday, Nov. 9, 5:30-8 p.m.

WHERE: The Millhouse at Philip S. Miller Park, 1375 W. Plum Creek Parkway, Castle Rock

TICKETS: $60 per person; includes hors d'oeuvres, cash bar and music.

INFO: Go to douglaslandconservancy.org/upcoming-events/oak-leaf-award-benefit/

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.