Letter to the editor: Strive for excellence

Posted 11/16/17

With the partisan rhetoric of the schoolboard elections behind us, it's time to ask, "will changes proposed by either side actually improve our schools?" While the new, anti-reform board will surely …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you’re a print subscriber or made a voluntary contribution in Nov. 2016-2017, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Letter to the editor: Strive for excellence

Posted

With the partisan rhetoric of the schoolboard elections behind us, it's time to ask, "will changes proposed by either side actually improve our schools?" While the new, anti-reform board will surely work to erase missteps from the past years, I challenge them to become reformers themselves. There are deeper issues than school choice, teacher turnover and merit pay. This isn't time for relativism; simply making the schools "better" than they were under the previous board won't cut it. We need to strive for excellence in the absolute sense.

One example that comes to mind is Thomas McLaren School in Colorado Springs. Despite being founded in 2009 as a charter with less per-student revenue and more minority and economically disadvantaged students than any DougCo high school, it has shown that fostering a true love of learning translates into achievement. Students are instructed to "know truth, create beauty, and practice goodness."

Their teachers are committed to a mission more than to a paycheck (starting teachers are paid about 30 percent less than starting DougCo teachers). While I think top teachers should be paid $80,000-plus, having teachers passionate enough to teach for beans is more of a justification for high pay than simply logging 20 years of "experience."

As long as we keep an isolated view of our own school system's potential, our schools - and students - will not truly be able to succeed. We have to push them well-beyond today's low bar. Sometimes the best system is entirely different than the current one.

Nathan Faber

Parker

Comments

No comments on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here
Please log in or register to add your comment